Contact Us for a Free Consultation 504-828-3313

Updates

Louisiana Law's "Move Over Law" Helps to Protect our First Responders

Posted by Amanda Gammon Morse | May 13, 2020 | 0 Comments

    Far too often officers police officers and other emergency responders such as EMTs and tow truck operators are injured or killed by passing vehicles while stopped responding to an accident, a distressed vehicle or making a traffic stop. As a result, Louisiana has enacted a Move Over Law to prevent injuries to police officers and other first responders.

             Under the Move Over Law, when a driver approaches a stopped emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, the driver should change lanes away from emergency vehicle. If it is not possible to change lanes, the driver should reasonably reduce their speed.  

              The Move Over Law is outlined in Louisiana R.S. 32:125, when an emergency vehicle is parked on the side of the road with any visual signals, the diver of every other vehicle shall:

(1)                 If on an interstate or highway with two or more lanes in the same direction, vehicles should yield the right of way by making a lane change away from the stopped vehicle, if possible. If unable to make a lane change, the driver should slow to a reasonably safe speed.

(2)                 Maintain a safe speed for road conditions if unable/ unsafe to change lanes or driving on a two-lane road.

The law also imposes a penalty, up to $200, for those who fail to comply with Louisiana's Move Over Law.

About the Author

Amanda Gammon Morse

Amanda is a junior associate at Kiefer & Kiefer. She focuses on insurance defense litigation. Amanda graduated from the LSU Paul M. Hebert Law Center in 2013 receiving both a Juris Doctor and Graduate Diploma in Comparative Law. Prior to law school, Amanda completed her undergraduate education i...

Comments

There are no comments for this post. Be the first and Add your Comment below.

Leave a Comment

CONTACT US

We are happy to provide you with a free consultation on your case.

Menu